Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1210
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dc.contributor.authorSummers, Z.-
dc.contributor.authorWilkie, B.-
dc.contributor.authorWickramasinghe, Nilmini-
dc.contributor.authorHiscock, Richard-
dc.contributor.authorWarrier, Satish-
dc.contributor.authorSmart, Philip-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T02:56:43Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-23T02:56:43Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-
dc.identifier.citationEpworth Research Institute Research Week 2017; Poster 58: pp 82en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11434/1210-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Experience with robotic colorectal surgery suggests it is safe and effective. Cost, steep learning curves, and long operating times have prohibited robotics from supplanting laparoscopic approaches. METHODS: 213 patients undergoing colorectal operations were retrospectively categorized into robotic (n=60) or laparoscopic surgery (n=153) and matched by surgeon and operation. RESULTS: Robotics cases had longer procedure times (303±14 vs 129±5 mins, p<0.0001), lower complications (p=0.048), more frequent ICU admissions (p=0.0001) with equivalent ICU stay, longer overall length of stay (9.6±1.2 vs 6.9±0.41 days, p=0.009), but equivalent 30-day readmission rates. CONCLUSION: Robotic surgery is safe, with equivalent complication rates, but consistently longer operating times.en_US
dc.subjectRobotic Colorectal Surgeryen_US
dc.subjectLearning Curveen_US
dc.subjectOperating Timeen_US
dc.subjectLaparoscopic Surgeryen_US
dc.subjectRoboticsen_US
dc.subjectComplication Ratesen_US
dc.subjectIntensive Care Uniten_US
dc.subjectICUen_US
dc.subjectLength of Stayen_US
dc.subjectReadmission Ratesen_US
dc.subjectComplication Ratesen_US
dc.subjectSafetyen_US
dc.subjectGeneral Surgery and Gastroenterology Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.subjectChair of Health Informatics Management, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.titleRobotic colorectal surgery at Epworth: a case control study.en_US
dc.typeConference Posteren_US
dc.description.affiliatesPeter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.description.affiliatesDepartment of Surgery, Austin Health, Vicotria, Australiaen_US
dc.type.studyortrialCase Control Studiesen_US
dc.description.conferencenameEpworth Research Institute Research Week 2017en_US
dc.description.conferencelocationEpworth Research Institute, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.type.contenttypeTexten_US
Appears in Collections:Cancer Services
General Surgery and Gastroenterology
Research Month

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