Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/961
Title: Prospective, case-matched study of heated and humidified carbon dioxide insufflation in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.
Epworth Authors: Tjandra, Joe
Chan, Miranda
Yeh, Chung Hung
Kwok, S. Y.
Keywords: Carbon Dioxide
Heated Carbon Dioxide
Humidified Carbon Dioxide
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Hot Temperature
Humidity
Insufflation
Clinical Benefits
Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery
General Surgery and Gastroenterology Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Oct-2007
Publisher: Wiley
Citation: Colorectal Dis. 2007 Oct;9(8):695-700
Abstract: PURPOSE: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is often prolonged and may cause hypothermia. It is uncertain if heated and humidified carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in laparoscopic colorectal surgery is beneficial. This is a prospective case-matched study on the use of heated and humidified CO(2) in patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery. METHOD: Twenty consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery with heated (36 degrees C) and humidified (95%) CO(2) were compared with 20 consecutive patients using standard CO(2) (30.2 degrees C). All procedures were performed by a single surgeon in an institution. The changes in core temperature during surgery, visual quality of images and the short-term clinical outcome were documented. RESULTS: The core temperature fell during surgery in both groups. Although the fall of core temperature was more in the control group, it was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The passage of flatus was more delayed in heated and humidified group (P = 0.004), but it did not affect the hospital discharge. All the other parameters, including the quality of visual images and the postoperative pain, were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Despite better temperature maintenance (nonsignificant), pneumoperitoneum using heated and humidified CO(2) gas did not appear to have any clinical benefits in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/961
DOI: 10.1111/j.1463-1318.2007.01339.x
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17711497
ISSN: 1463-1318
Journal Title: Colorectal Disease
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Department of Surgery, Caritas Medical Centre, Hong Kong
Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan.
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Prospective Study
Appears in Collections:General Surgery and Gastroenterology

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