Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/94
Title: The use of multimedia as an adjunct to the informed consent process for ankle ligament reconstruction surgery.
Epworth Authors: Batuyong, Eldridge
Beischer, Andrew
Other Authors: Birks, Christopher
Keywords: Lateral Ankle Ligament Instability
Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction
Multimedia Education
Informed Consent
Orthopaedics
Orthopedics
Foot
Ankle
Musculoskeletal Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Jun-2012
Citation: Foot Ankle Spec. 2012 Jun;5(3):150-9.
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Obtaining "informed consent" is an integral aspect of surgery that can be fraught with difficulty. This study assessed the efficacy of a multimedia education tool in improving patients' understanding when used as an adjunct to the traditional verbal consent process regarding ankle lateral ligament reconstruction surgery. METHODS: A total of 56 patients (28 males and 28 females) were recruited with a mean age of 36 years. A standardized verbal discussion regarding surgical treatment was provided to each patient. Understanding was then assessed using a knowledge questionnaire. Subsequently, each patient observed a multimedia educational program following which the knowledge questionnaire was repeated. Additional supplementary questions were then given regarding the ease of understanding and satisfaction with the 2 methods of education delivery. RESULTS: The patients answered 75% of the questions correctly before the multimedia module compared with 88% after it (P < .001). Patients rated the ease of understanding and the amount of information provided by the module highly (9.5 cm and 9.0 cm on a 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale scale, respectively), and 61% of patients considered that the multimedia tool performed as well as the treating surgeon. CONCLUSION: Multimedia tools used in sequence after a verbal consent resulted in improved patient understanding of pertinent information regarding ankle lateral ligament reconstruction surgery.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/94
DOI: 10.1177/1938640012439604
PubMed URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22441499
ISSN: 1938-6400
1938-7636
Journal Title: Foot & Ankle Specialist.
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Mercy Hospital, Dunedin, New Zealand.
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Survey
Appears in Collections:Clinical Education & Simulation
Musculoskeletal

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