Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/933
Title: Cartilage morphology at 2-3 years following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with or without concomitant meniscal pathology.
Epworth Authors: Feller, Julian
Whitehead, Timothy
Other Authors: Cicuttini, Flavia
Lloyd, David
Bryant, A. L.
Wang, Xinyang
Wang, Yuan
Bennell, Kim
Wrigley, Tim
Fortin, K.
Saxby, David
Van Ginckel, Ans
Dempsey, A. R.
Grigg, N.
Vertullo, C.
Bryant, A. L.
Keywords: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Osteoarthritis
Meniscal Injury
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Cartilage
ACLR
MRI
Cartilage Morphology
Lligament Reconstruction
Medial Tibia
Lateral Tibia
Patella
Medial Femoral Condyle
Bone Marrow Lesions
BMLs
Concomitant Meniscal Pathology
OA
Osteoarthritis
Musculoskeletal Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Oct-2015
Publisher: Springer
Citation: 2015 Oct. 27
Abstract: PURPOSE: To examine differences in cartilage morphology between young adults 2-3 years post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), with or without meniscal pathology, and control participants. METHODS: Knee MRI was performed on 130 participants aged 18-40 years (62 with isolated ACLR, 38 with combined ACLR and meniscal pathology, and 30 healthy controls). Cartilage defects, cartilage volume and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) were assessed from MRI using validated methods. RESULTS: Cartilage defects were more prevalent in the isolated ACLR (69 %) and combined group (84 %) than in controls (10 %, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the combined group showed higher prevalence of cartilage defects on medial femoral condyle (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 1.3-16.6) and patella (OR 7.8, 95 % CI 1.5-40.7) than the isolated ACLR group. Cartilage volume was lower in both ACLR groups compared with controls (medial tibia, lateral tibia and patella, P < 0.05), whilst prevalence of BMLs was higher on lateral tibia (P < 0.001), with no significant differences between the two ACLR groups for either measure. CONCLUSIONS: Cartilage morphology was worse in ACLR patients compared with healthy controls. ACLR patients with associated meniscal pathology have a higher prevalence of cartilage defects than ACLR patients without meniscal pathology. The findings suggest that concomitant meniscal pathology may lead to a greater risk of future OA than isolated ACLR.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/933
DOI: 10.1007/s00167-015-3831-1
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26506844
ISSN: 0942-2056 (Print); 1433-7347 (Online)
Journal Title: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. xinyangw@student.unimelb.edu.au.
School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. yuanyuan.wang@monash.edu.
Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. k.bennell@unimelb.edu.au.
Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. timw@unimelb.edu.au.
School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. flavia.cicuttini@monash.edu.
Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. kfortin@unimelb.edu.au.
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Griffith University, The Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. davidsaxby@gmail.com.
Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. ans.van@unimelb.edu.au.
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Griffith University, The Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. a.dempsey@murdoch.edu.au.
School of Psychology and Exercise Science, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia. a.dempsey@murdoch.edu.au.
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Griffith University, The Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. ngrigg.phd@gmail.com.
Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Centre, The Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. vertullo@me.com
La Trobe University Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. feller.admin@osv.com.au.
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Griffith University, The Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. david.lloyd@griffith.edu.au.
Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. albryant@unimelb.edu.au.
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Cohort Study
Appears in Collections:Musculoskeletal

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