Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/837
Title: Private sector surgical training: Feasibility through the lens of appendicectomy.
Epworth Authors: Yap, Raymond
Cullinan, Mark
Keywords: Surgical Education
General Surgery
Medical Training
Clinical Education
Surgical Training
Private Healthcare
Private Sector
Private Sector Training Programs
Training Positions
Appendicectomy
Feasibility
Registrars
Department of Surgery, Epworth Healthcare, Victoria, Australia
Clinical Education and Simulation, Epworth Healthcare, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Wiley
Citation: ANZ J Surg. 2016 Jun 9
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Training in medicine and surgery has been a public hospital responsibility in Australia. Increasing specialist training needs has led to pressure on speciality societies to find additional training posts, with one utilized solution being the establishment of private hospital training. This growing use has been despite no previously published evaluations of private hospital training in Australia. This article seeks to evaluate the feasibility of surgical training in private hospitals in appendicectomy. METHODS: Data were prospectively collected on registrar involvement in appendicectomy cases at a single private tertiary institution over 1 year. These data were divided into groups according to registrar involvement and analysed, looking at training caseload, operating theatre time and complications. RESULTS: A total of 122 cases were analysed over the study period. Registrars were more likely to have increased primary operator responsibility if they were an accredited versus unaccredited registrar (P = 0.04) and if the case was open versus laparoscopic (P < 0.001). There was an increase of 15% in total procedure time when the registrar was involved (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in complications whether the registrar was involved or not. CONCLUSION: Training in the private sector in Australia appears feasible, with a small loss of efficiency and no increase in complications. This article hopes to further encourage implementation and evaluation of private sector training programs to expand current training positions. Further studies, in different specialty and procedural domains, are needed to assess and evaluate the ongoing feasibility of private sector training.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/837
DOI: doi: 10.1111/ans.13511
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27283519
ISSN: 1445-2197
Journal Title: ANZ Journal of Surgery
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Department of Surgery, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Surgery, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Surgery, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Prospective Study
Appears in Collections:Clinical Education & Simulation

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