Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/751
Title: Evaluation of nasopharyngeal oxygen, nasal prongs and facemask oxygen therapy devices in adult patients: a randomised crossover trial.
Epworth Authors: Eastwood, Glenn
Other Authors: O'Connell, Bev
Gardner, Anne
Considine, Julie
Keywords: Laryngeal Masks
Nasal Cavity
Nasopharynx
Oximetry
Nasopharyngeal Oxygen Therapy
NPO
Nasal Prongs
NP
Facemask Oxygen Delivery Devices
Facemask
FM
Oxygen Saturation
SpO2
Critical Care Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Sep-2008
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Anaesth Intensive Care. 2008 Sep;36(5):691-4
Abstract: Nasopharyngeal oxygen (NPO) therapy may overcome some of the difficulties associated with nasal prongs and facemask oxygen delivery devices. In response to a lack of published studies of NPO therapy in adults, we conducted a prospective randomised crossover trial to compare the effectiveness of NPO, nasal prongs (NP) and facemasks (FM) when used in an adult population (n = 37) from the intensive care unit and general hospital wards. We measured oxygen saturation (SpO2) using pulse oximetry, oxygen flow (litres per minute), respiration rate (per minute) and comfort using a horizontal visual analogue scale. All three devices were effective in maintaining a SpO2 of > or = 95% (NP 97.0 +/- 1.9, NPO 97.7 +/- 1.7, FM 98.8 +/- 1.3%). NPO therapy consumed less oxygen than NP and FM therapy (NP 2.6 +/- 1.0, NPO 2.2 +/- 0.9, FM 6.1 +/- 0.4 l/min, P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in patients' respiratory rates (NP 19.9 +/- 3.2, NPO 19.9 +/- 3.0, FM 19.8 +/- 3.1 per minute, P = 0.491). In terms of comfort, patients rated NP higher than NPO and FM using a horizontal visual analogue scale (100 mm = most comfortable) (NP 65.5 +/- 14.3, NPO 62.8 +/- 19.4, FM 49.4 +/- 21.4 mm, P < 0.001). We conclude that for adult patients, nasal prongs and nasopharyngeal oxygen therapy consume less oxygen and provide greater comfort than facemasks while still maintaining SpO2 > or = 95%.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/751
PubMed URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18853588
ISSN: 1472-0299
0310-057X
Journal Title: Anasthesia and Intensive Care
Type: Journal Article
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial
Appears in Collections:Critical Care

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