Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/605
Title: High-level mobility outcomes following acquired brain injury: a preliminary evaluation.
Epworth Authors: Williams, Gavin
Morris, Meg
Keywords: Brain Injury
ABI
Acquired Brain Injury
Evaluation
High-Level Mobility Assessment Tool
HiMAT
Outcome Measures
Mobility Outcomes
Mobility Assessment Tools
Training Programmes
Rehabilitation
Strengthening Excercises
Agility Excercises
Running Drills
Physiotherapy
Physiotherapy Department, Epworth Hospital, Richmond, Vic., Australia
Issue Date: Aug-2009
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Citation: Brain Inj. 2009 Apr;23(4):307-12.
Abstract: PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a high-level mobility programme for people with acquired brain injury (ABI). RESEARCH DESIGN: A cohort study which evaluated the efficacy of a high-level mobility programme for people with ABI. SETTING: A major rehabilitation hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-eight people with acquired brain injury. EXPERIMENTAL INTERVENTIONS: A 3 month high-level mobility programme conducted twice weekly consisting of strengthening exercises, pre-running and running drills and agility exercises supplemented with a gym or home exercise programme. MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: The primary outcome measure was the high-level mobility assessment tool (HiMAT). Participants were predominantly male and young (average age 33.2 years, range 16-72 years) with chronic ABI. HiMAT scores for the 28 participants who returned at the 3 month follow-up initially ranged from 6-44 points (mean 20.3). The 3 month follow-up scores ranged from 12-51 points (mean 29.2). The mean HiMAT score change ranged from 2-20 points (mean 8.9). CONCLUSIONS: Significant recovery in high-level mobility was achieved during a 3 month running programme. People with chronic ABI may also expect to benefit from retraining high-level mobility. Clinical trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of training programmes for high-level mobility.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/605
DOI: 10.1080/02699050902774170
PubMed URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19330594
ISSN: 0269-9052
1362-301X
Journal Title: Brain Injury
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Centre for Health Exercise and Sports Medicine, School of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Cohort Study
Appears in Collections:Neurosciences
Rehabilitation

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