Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/442
Title: Engaging medical staff in clinical governance: introducing new technologies and clinical practice into public hospitals
Epworth Authors: Wells, Malcolm
Other Authors: Dwyer, Alison
Becker, Gavin
Hawkins, Cindy
McKenzie, Lisa
Keywords: Clinical Governance
Teaching Hospitals
Biomedical Technology
Hospital Administration
Physician's Practice Patterns
Staff Engagement
Organisational Framework Development
Organisational Framework Implementation
Best Practice
Epworth Eastern, Victoria, Australia.
Issue Date: Feb-2012
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Citation: Aust Health Rev. 2012 Feb;36(1):43-8
Abstract: Introduction. To enhance patient care, medical staff at major tertiary teaching hospitals are encouraged to innovate through introducing new technologies and clinical practices. However, such introduction must be safe, efficient, effective and appropriate for patients and the organisation, and actively lead by engage medical staff. Method. This study outlines the development, implementation and evaluation of a framework for introducing new technologies and clinical practice to a major tertiary health service. Evaluation includes survey of medical Heads of Units (HOUs) for framework’s effectiveness, and comparison of level of medical staff engagement against a best-practice model. Results. Over 2-year period: 19 applications, 7 approved. Successful external funding of $1.993 million achieved. Survey of HOUs in June 2009: response rate 59% (25 of 42 HOUs), with 11 of 25 respondents utilised the committee. Of those 14 of 25 who had not utilised the committee, low awareness of the committee’s existence (2 respondents). Most elements of the best-practice model for engaging medical staff were achieved. Recommendations include improvements to committee process and raising profile with medical staff. Discussion. This study demonstrates an effective and successful clinical governance process for introducing new technologies and clinical practice into a major tertiary teaching hospital, supported by moderate levels of medical staff engagement. What is known about the topic? To enhance patient care in an innovative research and teaching environment, medical staff at major tertiary teaching hospitals are encouraged to innovate and introduce new technologies and clinical practices. However, such introduction needs to be safe, efficient, effective and appropriate for patients and the organisation, and actively engage medical staff in overseeing such responsibility. What does this paper add? This study demonstrates an effective and successful clinical governance process for introducing new technologies and clinical practice into a major tertiary teaching hospital, supported by moderate levels of medical staff engagement. What are the implications for practitioners? All health services or hospitals with a focus for medical research and innovation, that incorporate new technologies into their clinical practice, should ensure governance processes similar to those outlined, to ensure best-practice evidence-based clinical and corporate governance. Effective engagement of medical staff in such processes is essential.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/442
DOI: 10.1071/AH10952
PubMed URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22513019
ISSN: 0156-5788
1449-8944
0156-5788
Journal Title: Australian Health Review
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne Health, Victoria, Australia
Austin Health, Victoria, Australia
Southern Health, Victoria, Australia
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Survey
Appears in Collections:Health Administration

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