Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/362
Title: Body weight at early and middle adulthood, weight gain and persistent overweight from early adulthood are predictors of the risk of total knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis
Epworth Authors: de Steiger, Richard
Other Authors: Wluka, Anita
Cicuttini, Flavia
Simpson, Julie
Giles, Graham
Graves, Stephen
Keywords: Musculoskeletal Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Osteoarthritis
Total Hip Replacement
Total Knee Replacement
Body Weight
Body Mass Index
Risk Factors
Overweight
Cohort Studies
Arthroplasty
Age Factors
Middle Aged
Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study
Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry
Issue Date: Jun-2013
Publisher: Oxford Journals
Citation: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2013 Jun;52(6):1033-41. doi: 10.1093/rheumatology/kes419. Epub 2013 Jan 28
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationships between weight at early and middle adulthood and adult weight gain and the risk of total knee and hip replacement for OA. METHODS: At baseline interview during 1990-94, 38,149 participants [mean age 54.9 (S.D. 8.6) years] of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study were asked to recall their weight at age 18-21 years and had their middle age height and weight measured. Total knee and hip replacement for OA between 2001 and 2009 was determined by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. RESULTS: Greater weight and BMI at age 18-21 years and middle age, weight gain and persistent overweight during this time were associated with an increased risk of total knee and hip replacement. Middle age weight [hazard ratio (HR) per 5 kg 1.25 (95% CI 1.23, 1.27) for knee vs 1.11 (1.09, 1.14) for hip] and BMI [HR per 5 kg/m(2) 1.80 (1.72, 1.89) vs 1.29 (1.21, 1.37)] and adult weight gain [HR per 5 kg 1.25 (1.23, 1.28) vs 1.10 (1.07, 1.13)] were more strongly associated with the risk of total knee replacement than total hip replacement (P for heterogeneity of HRs <0.0001). CONCLUSION: Greater body weight and BMI at early and middle adulthood, weight gain and persistent overweight from early to middle adulthood are risk factors for knee and hip OA. Adult weight gain confers stronger risk on knee OA than hip OA. Weight control from early adulthood and avoiding weight gain are important for the prevention of OA.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/362
DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/kes419
PubMed URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23362222
ISSN: 1462-0324
1462-0332
Journal Title: Rheumatology (Oxford)
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Centre for Molecular, Environmental, Genetic and Analytic Epidemiology, School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria
Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Carlton, Victoria
Department of Orthopaedics, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia
Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry, Discipline of Public Health, School of Population Health & Clinical Practice, University of Adelaide, South Australia
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Cohort Study
Appears in Collections:Musculoskeletal

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