Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/356
Title: Selecting and modifying methods of manual muscle testing for classification in Paralympic sport.
Epworth Authors: Williams, Gavin
Other Authors: Tweedy, Sean
Bourke, John
Keywords: Physiotherapy Department, Epworth Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Muscle Strength
Assessment, Patient Outcome
Outcome Assessment, Patient
Patient Outcome Assessment
Sports for Persons with Disabilities
Muscle Hypertonia
Paresis
Chronic Limitation of Activity
Limitation of Activity, Chronic
Range of Motion, Articular
Coordination Impairment
Ataxia
Lack of Coordination
Athetosis
MMT
Manual Muscle Testing
Paralympic
Issue Date: Sep-2011
Publisher: European Federation of Adapted Physical Activities (EUFAPA)
Citation: European Journal of Adapted Physical Activity 2011; 3(2): 7-16.
Abstract: Many Paralympic sports classification systems use unspecified manual muscle testing (MMT) methods to assess impairment of muscle strength. This is a potential source of inconsistency in classification, and could be eliminated by nominating a single, published set of MMT methods. Additionally, four modifications can enhance the validity, reliability and utility of conventional MMT methods for classification: 1) limiting assessment to movements that are important to performance in the sport concerned; 2) specifying a single preferred technique for assessment of movement strength; 3) changing the reference range of movement from normal anatomical range to the maximum range of movement required in sport; and 4) adjusting testing techniques so that they are relevant for the sport. This brief communication may improve classification in established sports, and provide guidance for emerging sports that are developing classification systems.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/356
URL: http://www.eujapa.upol.cz/index.php/EUJAPA/article/download/23/21
ISSN: 1803-3857
Journal Title: European Journal of Adapted Physical Activity
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: The University of Queensland, School of Human Movement Studies, Australia
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St John of God Health Care, Australia
Appears in Collections:Rehabilitation

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