Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1704
Title: Laparoscopic transabdominal cerclage in pregnancy: a single centre experience.
Authors: Aref-Adib, Mehrnoosh
Parghi, Sneha
Other Authors: Ades, Alex
Keywords: Cerclage
Cervical Insufficiency
Laparoscopic Surgery
Pregnancy
Transabdominal Cerclage
Preterm Birth
Laparoscopic Transabdominal Cerclage
Neonatal Survival
Surgical Morbidity
Perinatal Survival Rate
General Surgery and Gastroenterology Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Jun-2019
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2019 Jun;59(3):351-355
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Transabdominal cerclage can reduce the risk of preterm birth in women with cervical insufficiency. AIMS: This study evaluated outcomes following insertion of a laparoscopic transabdominal cerclage in pregnant women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective observational study. PATIENTS: pregnant women who underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cerclage from 2011 to 2017. Eligible women had cervical insufficiency and were not suitable for a transvaginal cerclage. INTERVENTION: the insertion of a laparoscopic transabdominal cerclage in the pregnancy. MEASUREMENTS: neonatal survival, delivery of an infant at ≥34 weeks gestation and surgical morbidity were evaluated. RESULTS: Of 19 women who underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cerclage in pregnancy, at 6-11 weeks gestation, the perinatal survival rate was 100%. There were no complications. The average gestational age at delivery was 37.1 weeks. Sixteen women delivered after 34 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic transabdominal cerclage is a safe and effective procedure in women with poor obstetric histories. It requires the correct skill, expertise and patient selection.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1704
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/ajo.12848
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29984840
ISSN: 0004-8666
Journal Title: The Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Women's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Appears in Collections:General Surgery and Gastroenterology

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