Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1365
Title: Human aging and global function of coenzyme Q10.
Epworth Authors: Linnane, Anthony
Zhang, Chunfang
Yarovaya, Natalia
Kopsidas, George
Kovalenko, Sergey
Papakostopoulos, Penny
Eastwood, Hayden
Richardson, Martin
Other Authors: Graves, Stephen
Keywords: Aging
Physiology
Coenzymes
Cytoprotection
DNA, Mitochondrial
Metabolism
Electron Transport Complex IV
Gene Expression Regulation
Muscle, Skeletal
Cytology
Enzymology
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Succinate Dehydrogenase
Ubiquinone
Analogs & Derivatives
Centre for Molecular Biology and Medicine, Epworth Medical Centre, Richmond, Victoria, Australia.
Issue Date: Apr-2002
Publisher: New York Academy of Sciences
Citation: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002 Apr; 959: 396-411
Abstract: In this paper, we review two parts of our recent work on human skeletal muscle. The first part mainly describes changes occurring during aging, whereas the second part discusses the functions of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), particularly in relation to the aging process. During the lifetime of an individual, mtDNA undergoes a variety of mutation events and rearrangements. These mutations and their consequent bioenergenic decline, together with nuclear DNA damage, contribute to the reduced function of cells and organs, especially in postmitotic tissues. In skeletal muscle, this functional decline can be observed by means of changes with age in fiber type profile and the reduction in the number and size of the muscle fibers. In addition to the functions of coenzyme Q10 as an electron carrier in the respiratory chain and as an antioxidant, CoQ10 has been shown to regulate global gene expression in skeletal muscle. We hypothesize that this regulation is achieved via superoxide formation with H2O2 as a second messenger to the nucleus.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1365
DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2002.tb02110.x
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11976213
ISSN: 1749-6632
Journal Title: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Royal Melbourne Hospital, Orthopaedic Department, Gratten Street, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Review
Appears in Collections:Pre-Clinical

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