Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1190
Title: Alcohol and drug use following traumatic brain injury: a prospective study.
Epworth Authors: Ponsford, Jennie
Whelan-Goodinson, Rochelle
Bahar-Fuchs, Alex
Keywords: Alcohol Drinking
Epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders
Diagnosis
Brain Injuries
Psychology
Depressive Disorders
Substance-Related Disorders
Drug Use
Alcohol Use
Traumatic Brain Injury
TBI
Post-Injury Substance Use
Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test
AUDIT
Drug Abuse Screening Test
DAST
Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale
HADS
Interventions
Monash-Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre, Epworth HealthCare, Melbourne, Australia
Issue Date: Dec-2007
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Citation: Brain Inj. 2007 Dec;21(13-14):1385-92
Abstract: PRIMARY OBJECTIVES: To establish pre-morbid alcohol and drug use in persons with TBI, relative to controls, investigate how patterns of substance use change over time following TBI and identify factors associated with heavy post-injury substance use. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification test (AUDIT) and Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST) was completed by 121 hospital inpatients with TBI, documenting pre-injury alcohol and drug use, and 133 demographically similar controls. Participants with TBI completed these measures and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) again 1 and 2 years post-injury and 76 also completed them at 3 years. RESULTS: Participants with TBI showed similar levels of drug and alcohol use to controls pre-injury, with 31.4% of the TBI group and 29.3% of controls drinking at hazardous levels. Alcohol and drug use declined in the first year post-injury, but increased by 2 years post-injury, with only 21.4% of participants with TBI reporting abstinence from alcohol and 25.4% drinking at hazardous levels. Only 9% showed a drug problem, but 24% had returned to some drug use. Those showing heavy alcohol use post-injury were young, male and heavy drinkers pre-injury. Drug and alcohol use was similar at 3 years post-injury. CONCLUSIONS: More active intervention is needed to reduce alcohol and drug use following TBI.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1190
DOI: 10.1080/02699050701796960
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18066940
ISSN: 0269-9052
1362-301X
Journal Title: Brain Injury
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Monash University, Richmond, VA, Australia
National Trauma Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Prospective Study
Appears in Collections:Mental Health
Neurosciences
Rehabilitation

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