Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/118
Title: Cognitive changes after saline or plasmalyte infusion in healthy volunteers: a multiple blinded, randomized, cross-over trial.
Epworth Authors: Velissaris, Sarah
Other Authors: Story, David
Weinberg, Laurence
Teoh, Soon-Yee
Lee, Katherine
Bellomo, Rinaldo
Wilson, Sarah
Lees, Lucy
Keywords: Nursing
Clinical Medicine
Health Professions
Anesthesiology
Psychology
Cognitive Science
Anaesthesia
Issue Date: Sep-2013
Citation: Anesthesiology. 2013 Sep;119(3):569-75. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e31829416ba.
Abstract: Background: In an incidental finding, during a study of plasma chemistry after crystalloid infusion, participants reported subjective cognitive changes, particularly slower thinking, after saline but not Hartmann's (Ringer's lactate) solution. The authors tested the hypothesis that saline infusion would produce greater adverse cognitive changes than Plasmalyte infusion. Methods: The authors conducted a randomized, cross-over, multiple blinded study of healthy adult volunteers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/118
DOI: doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e31829416ba.
PubMed URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23598288
ISSN: 0003-3022
Journal Title: Anesthesiology.
Type: Text
Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Anaesthesia, Perioperative and Pain Medicine Unit, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne.
Department of Anaesthesia, and Senior Fellow, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Anaesthesia, Austin Hospital.
Murdoch Children's Research Institute and Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne.
Epworth Rehabilitation, Camberwell, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Intensive Care, Austin Hospital, and Professor, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Melbourne.
Neuropsychological Research, Epilepsy Research Centre, Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Austin Health.
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Crossover Design
Appears in Collections:Rehabilitation

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