Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1158
Title: Key factors for the successful adoption of IS/IT in healthcare: a fit-viability perspective.
Epworth Authors: Muhammad, Imran
Haddad, Peter
Wickramasinghe, Nilmini
Keywords: Clinical Information Systems
Fit Viability
Healthcare Organisations
Information Technolgy
IT
Information Systems
IS
IS/IT
Management Executives
Clinicians
Clinical IT
Interviews
Online Surveys
Chair of Health Informatics Management, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Jun-2017
Citation: Epworth Research Institute Research Week 2017; Poster 31: pp 55
Conference: Epworth Research Institute Research Week 2017
Conference Location: Epworth Research Institute, Victoria, Australia
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The proliferation of clinical information systems in healthcare contexts has increased exponentially over the last 5 years. However, for these systems to be successful, their fit becomes an essential consideration. This study assesses the fit of three different clinical information systems and the readiness of the organization to adopt these systems. BACKGROUND: Adopting clinical information systems is becoming a strategic necessity for all healthcare providers. Many of these investments though have not achieved the expected outcomes due to numerous factors. We suggest fit (or lack of good fit) is an essential consideration. METHOD: This research is exploratory in nature, including both qualitative and quantitative methods. For the qualitative component, the study subscribes to the directives of Yin who notes that such an approach enables conducting in-depth studies and research about a broad range of topics and at the same time provides greater latitude in selecting topics of interest. Further, the study includes 28 semi-structured interviews with key informants in the selected case. The interviewees are classified into four categories, namely management and executives, IT, clinicians, and clinical IT. Further, the study employs an online survey to target a wider audience at the selected case. CONCLUSIONS: Currently, we have developed the conceptual model. Now, we must test it to assess the relative importance of the identified factors that affect the fit of clinical IS/IT. We then plan to test the model in other healthcare systems both in Australia and overseas including Canada, China, Germany, and US. Once all stages of testing are complete, the robustness of the model would be established and its benefits to improving the readiness of healthcare organizations and the fit of IS/IT systems for any healthcare organization will be the primary contribution of this study to theory and practice.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1158
Type: Conference Poster
Affiliated Organisations: Faculty of Health, Deakin University
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Exploratory Qualitative Design
Appears in Collections:Health Informatics

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