Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1128
Title: Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity in midtrimester pregnancies using molecular microbiology.
Epworth Authors: Rowlands, Shelley
Other Authors: Danielewski, Jennifer
Tabrizi, Sepehr
Garland, Suzanne
Walker, Susan
Keywords: Amniotic Fluid
Chorioamnionitis
Intraamniotic Infection
Molecular Microbiology
Mycoplasma Hominis
Preterm Birth
Sterile Biological Fluid
Ureaplasma Urealyticum
Fungi
Microbial Invasion
Amniotic Cavity
Midtrimester
Pregnancy
Microbial Invasion
Ureaplasma Parvum
Mycoplasma Genitalium
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Pregnancy Outcome
Department of Maternity Services, Epworth Freemasons Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Mar-2017
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Mar 6. pii: S0002-9378(17)30383-6
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity in the midtrimester of pregnancy in patients undergoing amniocentesis for clinical indications. STUDY DESIGN: This was a prospective investigation of the amniotic fluid of 344 asymptomatic women recruited in midpregnancy for the presence of microbial DNA. Amniotic samples obtained at the time of amniocentesis for genetic testing on women between 15 and 22 weeks of gestation were tested specifically for the presence of Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Mycoplasma hominis, and Mycoplasma genitalium as well as for other bacteria and fungi using broad-range polymerase chain reaction only. Pregnancy outcomes were reviewed independent of all molecular test results. RESULTS: Using broad-range polymerase chain reaction, the prevalence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity in women between 15 and 22 weeks of gestation was 0% (0 vs 344). Early preterm delivery occurred in only 4 women (1%); 1 delivered electively and 3 spontaneously. None were associated with Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Mycoplasma hominis, or Mycoplasma genitalium. In addition, broad range polymerase chain reaction did not reveal the presence of other bacterial or fungal microbes. CONCLUSION: Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity in midtrimester gestations of low-risk pregnant women was not detected using molecular methods in 344 patients.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1128
DOI: 10.1016/j.ajog.2017.02.051
PubMed URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28268197
ISSN: 0002-9378
Journal Title: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Type: Journal Article
Affiliated Organisations: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Mercy Hospital for Women, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Perinatal Medicine, Mercy Hospital for Women, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Prospective Study
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics & Gynaecology

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