Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1109
Title: Identifying key success factors for the adoption and implementation of a chemotherapy ordering system: A case study from the Australian private healthcare sector.
Epworth Authors: Haddad, Peter
Wickramasinghe, Nilmini
Vaughan, Stephen
Lin, Catherine
Delimitros, Helen
Moghimi, Hoda
Keywords: Chemotherapy Ordering System
Actor Network Theory
Agency Theory
Computerized Physician Order Entry System
Private Healthcare Sector
CPOE
COS
Benefits
Economic Perspective
Barriers
Implementation
ANT
Chair of Health Informatics Management, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Deakin University and Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
RMIT University and Epworth Research Institute, Australia
Cancer Services Clinical Institute, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Healthcare Information Systems and Technology (SIGHealth). AMCIS 2015 Proceedings; Paper 7
Conference: Americas Conference on Information Systems. Conference (21st : 2015 : Puerto Rico)
Conference Location: Puerto Rico, USA
Abstract: This paper is designed to systematically assess the benefits of a chemotherapy ordering system (COS) for the private healthcare sector, in Australia. By taking a rational economic perspective and modeling the principle-agent relationships using an actor network framework, it is possible to evaluate various scenarios and thereby assess the benefits, barriers and facilitators, possible COS can have. In this study, four propositions are tested using a mixed methodology which will serve to facilitate the decision making processes regarding the choice and implementation of the appropriate COS for a private health provider.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11434/1109
URL: http://aisel.aisnet.org/amcis2015/HealthIS/GeneralPresentations/7/
Type: Conference Paper
Affiliated Organisations: RMIT University, Australia
Type of Clinical Study or Trial: Descriptive Study
Appears in Collections:Cancer Services
Health Informatics

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